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Notes on rehearsing Traviata. By Leonard Slatkin

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Does the name sound familiar? it should. He's the conductor of La Traviata at the Met. And he has a very good habbit. He keeps a sort of monthly diary about his activity. And this is how I could find out details that usually nobody talks about. What's going on before the curtain rises at the official premiere. What we have here it's just the first part of the story that starts on March 15th and covers the first week of rehearsals. I hope he gets some time to post the rest.
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Mr Slatkin tells a very nice story about how he got to conduct the last run of the classical (Zefirelli) production at the Met, how he was one of the few people there (if not the only one) that has never got in touch with this opera before. His story is also about Angela (how enjoyable she can be at the rehearsals and also how she calls in sick), about Thomas Hampson's late arrival at the rehearsals because he was ill. He says that there are only 8 rehearsals (or 8 and half - some were skipped because Angela had to rehears La Boheme for March 20th). And that during the first week he hasn't seen/or worked with the chorus, which concerns him a little.
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After this week, he considers that one of the most powerful moments of the opera will be the duet in the second act, between Violeta and Giorgio Germont. It seems that Angela and Thomas are great. We'll see what happens next.
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The article is here. Scroll down a little bit. I let you discover what else Leonard Slatkin is saying. Enjoy your reading! And toi toi toi for tomorrow night, for everybody.
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4 comments:

  1. The second act with Violetta and Germont is my favorite part of the opera. Looking foward to hearing these singers together!

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  2. Decca and the Royal Opera House have released the best version of La Traviata of all times. The most powerful scene for me, if I may, is at the end of the first act when Violetta (Angela) let herself fall back in exhaustion in the big round couch after almost 15 unbelievable non-stop singing. All lights go off and when it comes back, there she is, standing like the Cinderella that she truly is. Everyone riots, "Bravo! Bravo!" everyone has to hail.
    Excellent blog by the way.

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  3. You're right. And I'm counting the days to Traviata at Roh this July.
    Thanks for the nice words regarding my blog!

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  4. It's always nice to find out things about rehearsals and also inside information that otherwise is not available to the public. Looking forward to the following notes from Leonard Slatkin!

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